Find the version number of all WordPress installations on your Linux server.

I have a lot of customers running WordPress on our shared hosting servers, and sometimes they neglect to update their WordPress installs. [Rolls Eyes]

I need to know which of these sites are using an obsolete version of WordPress so I may contact the customer and warn them that they need to update their software.

So here’s a helpful little Linux command I whipped up and ran as root to go through my /home folder searching for all WordPress versions. I only had to run it as root because I am checking through all users’ folders, not just my own. If you only want to check your own user, you don’t need root access.

I ran this command from my /home folder on the Linux server:

find . -name 'version.php' -exec grep '$wp_version =' {} /dev/null \; > /tmp/wordpress-versions.log

Breakdown:

  • find . -name ‘version.php’
    Search through the current folder, recursively, for any file named version.php. This is where WordPress stores the WordPress version number.
  • -exec
    Execute a command with each found item.
  • grep ‘$wp_version =’ {}
    Look within the found version.php file(s) in a loop for the term $wp_version = and output the result.
  • /dev/null
    Trick grep into thinking there is a second file, forcing it to precede the output with the filename provided by find
  • \;
    Close the find command.
  • > /tmp/wordpress-versions.log
    Save the results to a log file in /tmp. You can tail -f this file while scanning, or simply open or cat it when you’re done. Leave this portion out of the command if you’d rather have it output directly to your screen.

Memory leak in Zimbra 8.0.6 webmail

I’ve had a suspicion that since the Zimbra 8.0.6 update, something’s been wonky with Zimbra’s webmail client, so I decided to perform a very simple test: open Zimbra Webmail and leave it running.

Here is the outcome of that test.

Normal Operation for one business day.
This is how I operate day after day in my normal office environment.

Running:

  • Zimbra 8.0.6_GA_5922
  • Chromium Version 32.0.1700.123 Debian 7.4 (248368)

Memory Usage at Application Launch:

  • Browser window with Zimbra webmail client
    Thursday 8:47am – 139.5MB
  • Browser window with Google
    Thursday 8:55am – 45.92MB

Memory Usage ~ 24 Hours Later:
I left both browser windows running overnight. Here is where the memory usage stands…

  • Browser window with Zimbra webmail client
    Friday 8:28am – 564.3MB – 304% Increase in 24 Hours
  • Browser window with Google
    Friday 8:29am – 60.78MB – 32% Increase in 24 Hours

Memory Usage ~4 Days Later:
I left both browser windows running over the weekend.  Here is where the memory usage stands…

  • Browser window with Zimbra webmail client
    Monday 10:32am – 1.6 GB – 1,046% Increase in ~96 Hours
  • Browser window with Google
    Monday 10:33am – 60.53MB – 31% Increase in ~96 Hours

Since Zimbra cut the Evolution Connector from its product line, and the Zimbra Desktop software is still only available for a 32-bit platform, this leaves Zimbra operation on Linux sorely lacking. What has VMWare done?!  Hopefully Telligent can fix it.

-Robbie

*** UPDATE March 24, 2014 ***
We’ve ruled out Chrome by itself as the issue since it is only the window containing the Zimbra webmail client that shows any increase in memory usage.

To rule out browser extensions, I will run my next test with all Chrome extensions disabled.
Test 2 – Disable all Chrome Extensions and re-test.

Memory Usage After Weekend:

  • Browser window with Zimbra webmail client
    Friday 5:06pm – 106.3 MB

Memory Usage After Weekend:

  • Browser window with Zimbra webmail client
    Monday 8:37am – 1.7 GB

*** UPDATE April 15, 2014 ***
This has been added as a bug report for 88031 – https://bugzilla.zimbra.com/show_bug.cgi?id=88031